The game’s afoot

My copy of Good Omens, signed in Dec. 2009 by Neil Gaiman

A quick quote for Throw­back Thurs­day:

God does not play dice with the uni­verse; He plays an inef­fa­ble game of His own devis­ing, which might be com­pared, from the per­spec­tive of any of the oth­er play­ers, to being involved in an obscure and com­plex ver­sion of pok­er in a pitch-dark room, with blank cards, for infi­nite stakes, with a Deal­er who won’t tell you the rules, and who smiles all the time.

From Good Omens, by Ter­ry Pratch­ett and Neil Gaiman

Christmas movies

still from A Charlie Brown Christmas.

Is Die Hard the best Christ­mas movie? I dun­no, I’ve always leaned toward The Night­mare Before Christ­mas*, myself.

But this arti­cle makes a com­pelling point for oth­ers, too. I just re-watched Kiss Kiss Bang Bang in the sum­mer­time, dur­ing my writ­ing retreat. (How is that five months ago already? Man, time flies.)

[M]ost of his films [have a] fairy-tale like sheen, sim­i­lar to what makes Die Hard so suc­cess­ful. And mak­ing it Christ­mas in L.A. (which the major­i­ty of his films do), offers a dif­fer­ent sen­si­bil­i­ty to the use of the hol­i­day on film.

—Emi­ly Ash­er-Per­rin, Die Hard is Great, but Shane Black is the King of Christ­mas Explo­sions

* Oh who am I kid­ding? Night­mare is sec­ond; A Char­lie Brown Christ­mas is first, even if it’s only about half an hour long.

Down in Fraggle Rock

Today I learned that…

Den­nis Lee, Cana­di­an poet, author of child­hood favourite “Alli­ga­tor Pie”, was also the co-founder of the ven­er­a­ble Cana­di­an press House of Anan­si Press (which, even though I’m ill-versed in Can­Lit, I’d heard of).

And he wrote the lyrics to the theme song for Frag­gle Rock.

And he co-wrote the sto­ry for the movie Labyrinth.

[Cita­tion need­ed]

Whoops

In the end, it looks like lightning, kind of

I call this one “I did­n’t mean to set it to 6s, f/32, ISO1600, but look how it turned out”.

Edit­ed in GIMP: basi­cal­ly, stacked the same lay­er about 5 deep, with all but the bot­tom-most set to “Mul­ti­ply”.

A checkout story

I stopped in at Co-op to get some gro­ceries, and got in the short­est line I could find. The guy in front of me, man, he was a sto­ry.

He had a thin beard, grey eyes, and wore a bas­ket­ball tank-top and a ball cap. His arms were tat­tooed with num­bers and designs: a 12 on his left fore­arm, an ankh on one wrist, the word SATAN’S crawl­ing down the inside of his right fore­arm.

He had a 2‑litre bot­tle of store-brand cream soda, vio­lent­ly pink, and four pack­ages of Reese’s Peanut But­ter Cups. He paid his bill—$7.86—with a dou­ble fist­ful of dimes, and got 15¢ change back.

He’s got a sto­ry to tell. Prob­a­bly quite a few of them, real­ly. I just have no idea if I’m tough enough to hear them.