A bit of excitement

I pulled up at Chez Angela not long after a car acci­dent. As I was prepar­ing to leave, the ambu­lance pulled up and parked next to me, box­ing me in, so I went back into the bak­ery and had a cof­fee to wait them out.

The cars involved are on the oth­er side of the fire truck in the pho­to. I felt it would be bad form to wan­der around the site tak­ing pho­tos. Plus it was way warmer inside, sip­ping my cof­fee, than out in the street.

When I left, about ten min­utes lat­er, the police were still there, and two tow trucks had showed up.

As far as I could tell, no one was seri­ous­ly hurt, but at least one of the vehi­cles was not in great shape.

The Hollow Bean 2019 count

Happy Hollow Bean

This year we had the fol­low­ing cos­tumes come to the door look­ing for can­dy (and receiv­ing 2 full-size bars apiece, because frankly we bought more can­dy than we should have):

  • a kid in par­ka and bal­a­cla­va
  • a knight
  • a princess in a par­ka
  • a princess in a dif­fer­ent par­ka
  • Mal­e­fi­cient, horns ‘n’ all
  • a princess
  • a uni­corn with wings
  • Elsa (I think)
  • a princess asleep on her mom’s shoul­der (her old­er sis­ter, in the Elsa cos­tume, col­lect­ed can­dy for her)

…for a grand total of nine.

I should’ve giv­en ’em all 3 bars.

Last year: 10; 2017: 16.

The last few days

Our friend Tess dropped by for a vis­it last week­end, and stayed overnight. I decid­ed to snap a pho­to of her, and one of Kath­leen as well.

Then I saw a love­ly red-and-yel­low autumn tree on my way to work.

Autumn leaves
The tree up the block went all red and yel­low

And today it snowed.

Winter
The court­yard through a win­dow spot­ted with snow

Farewell, summer

Sunset on Clear Lake

A friend told me once about his young son’s reac­tion to autumn. The boy was maybe two years old, and my friend took him out into the yard to watch the leaves fall from the trees. After a cou­ple moments spent look­ing around with con­ster­na­tion on his face, the son picked up a dou­ble hand­ful of leaves, held them up to his father, and said, “Fix it, Dad­dy!”

I feel the same, kid. I’m not ready for sum­mer to be done, but there were yel­low leaves on the deck this week­end and I had to use the space heater at the office today.

I know a lot of peo­ple who love fall, with its sweaters and the riot of colours in the trees, but to me it’s just the gate­way to yet anoth­er win­ter. I’m def­i­nite­ly a spring-and-sum­mer kind of guy.

#sii­i­i­igh

Shodan × 2

Two of my judo stu­dents/­co-instruc­tors grad­ed today for their 1st degree black belts (or shodan). They did just fine.

It was an odd expe­ri­ence for me. They were the first two that I’ve shep­herd­ed that far. It felt like a test-by-proxy for me, as well as a test for them.

Con­grat­u­la­tions to Neal and Joe. Wel­come to the dan ranks.

Bike Ride

It’s a long week­end Mon­day here in Cana­da, so I went for a nice long bike ride today. 23km and change, in a bit under two hours. There was quite a wind out of the east, so I’m hap­py with that time.

I had my cam­era with me, and so I snapped a cou­ple pho­tos: a goose land­ing in the riv­er, above, and a train under the 1st Street bridge, below.

Train under the 1st Street Bridge

I did­n’t get a pho­to of the fam­i­ly in the not-yet-open splash park on 1st Street south of Rich­mond (Kins­men Park, I think), mak­ing do with a water-gun fight.

Encyclopedia Brown

When I was a kid, I read a lot. I worked my way through the Hardy Boys mys­ter­ies, and even read a Nan­cy Drew book or two before I decid­ed those were more in line with my sis­ter’s sen­si­bil­i­ties.

One day I dis­cov­ered Ency­clo­pe­dia Brown in the local pub­lic library, in a book of ten short mys­ter­ies whose end­ings were hid­den at the back of the book, like a puz­zle book. I was hooked. I read all the EB books the library had, and—if I recall correctly—I also dis­cov­ered that inter­li­brary loan would bring me new tales.

As I aged, I dis­cov­ered that names like “Franklin W. Dixon” and “Car­olyn Keene”, authors of the Hardy Boys and the Nan­cy Drew mys­ter­ies, respec­tive­ly, were “house names”, false iden­ti­ties adopt­ed by writ­ers who would write one or two or ten nov­els in the series, then move on. I long assumed that Don­ald J. Sobol, the name on the spine of the Ency­clo­pe­dia Brown col­lec­tions, was also a house name.

I was wrong. Don­ald J. Sobol was a real per­son, a sin­gle, sin­gu­lar author, and this is his sto­ry.

A year without glasses

Eye (photo by Vanessa Bumbeers)

This time last year, I was still wear­ing hard plas­tic eye-shields to bed, thanks to my laser eye surgery. But my vision has been 20/16 since then, and the only glass­es I’ve had to wear are sun­glass­es and (to my wife’s ever­green amuse­ment) read­ing glass­es.

Thanks to Dr. Rocha and his entire crew for mak­ing my eyes bet­ter than they’ve been since, oh, grade 2 or so.

(That’s still not my eye­ball. Pho­to by Vanes­sa Bum­beers on Unsplash)