Volleyball

We went and watched my nephew’s team play some vol­ley­ball this week­end. Did you know that kick­ing the ball is allowed nowa­days?

Also, in unre­lat­ed news, appar­ent­ly I’m old now.

(Aside: I just searched unsplash.com for “vol­ley­ball”, look­ing for a suit­able head­er image, and I was frankly sur­prised at how many motor­cy­cles and surf­boards it turned up.)

The Tao of Pratchett

Over on Tor.com, a dis­cus­sion of Sir Ter­ry Pratchett’s works, and how there’s more to them—far more—than just sil­ly puns and goofy char­ac­ters.

Ter­ry Pratch­ett is best known for his incom­pe­tent wiz­ards, drag­on-wield­ing police­men, and anthro­po­mor­phic per­son­i­fi­ca­tions who SPEAK LIKE THIS. And we love him for it. Once we’re done chuck­ling at Nan­ny Ogg’s not-so-sub­tle innu­en­dos and the song about the knob on the end of the wizard’s staff, how­ev­er, there’s so much more going on beneath the sur­face of a Pratch­ett nov­el.

Read the whole arti­cle; it’s worth it.

The game’s afoot

My copy of Good Omens, signed in Dec. 2009 by Neil Gaiman

A quick quote for Throw­back Thurs­day:

God does not play dice with the uni­verse; He plays an inef­fa­ble game of His own devis­ing, which might be com­pared, from the per­spec­tive of any of the oth­er play­ers, to being involved in an obscure and com­plex ver­sion of pok­er in a pitch-dark room, with blank cards, for infi­nite stakes, with a Deal­er who won’t tell you the rules, and who smiles all the time.

From Good Omens, by Ter­ry Pratch­ett and Neil Gaiman