My day

Went to the bank today to finalize the loan we’re getting to re-side the house. Likely some of the money will end up in the basement, too; we’ve got some mold in some of the drywall, and so that’ll have to be rectified.

Did some writing tonight while the laundry was running. There’s a “Clichés in SF” special issue coming up of Subterranean Press, and I had an interesting idea today involving a Mad Scientist, so I got about 400 words down. Snippet:

The eyes, Schulz mused, drew you in. They were Rasputin eyes, dark holes into the man’s dark soul. The face was rugged, handsome in a three-days’-growth kind of way, reminding her of a college roommate’s boyfriend.

The black-and-white photo was a blowup off a government ID, expanded slightly more than it should have been. Jagged square pixellations distracted you, making it difficult to see the face in full. Forest for the trees.

The folder next to the photo was as thick as the Sunday Times. LEDBECKER, M. was printed on it in a font meant to suggest an outmoded impact typewriter. A succession of white stickers were below the name, labeled Part 1 of 2, Part 1 of 3, and Part 1 of 4. Someone—Schulz suspected it was Lipton—had scrawled Part 1 of a continuing saga in red felt-tip under the labels.

Then I did some work on a PHP project that is coming up due. <geek>I hadn’t realized that it’s not necessary to do a mysql_close() when working with a MySQL DB. Learn something new every day.</geek>

And now I’m off to pick up the wife from work, and find out how her day went.

How’d everybody else’s day go?

2 thoughts on “My day

  1. Busy. Finished reading the stories in Brutarian #44 between patients; saw a bunch of people today; came home, wrote up part 2 of my manifesto, wrote a review of the Brutarian stories for Tangent. Hopefully that will be on line tomorrow.

    Got good news yesterday: Bill Rupp, editor of Continuum and buyer of two of my better stories, is back in action. I may finally get a story in print — “All Change” is supposed to show up in his summer issue. Non-electronic print, that is.

    So, what do geek tags do in HTML? Make it so that only geeks can see? But hey — I saw it, and I’m not that kind of geek. Am I?

  2. The <geek> tags indicate that I’m about to engage in some geeking out*. It’s kind of like a gentle warning. Or maybe it’s like putting les mots qui parvient d’autre langues** in italics.

    * Geekery? Geekityness?
    ** “Words from other languages”.

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